Charlotte Shay
Charlotte is a pen name I hope to go by one day. For now, I'm just Kathy, a lazy college kid.

xtitlefight:

fuck hahahahaaha

152,969 notes4.246:27 PM
jessewilleatyou:

supersmashkev:

been a long day 

same

jessewilleatyou:

supersmashkev:

been a long day 

same

source: supersmashkev
32,029 notes4.246:25 PM
osuda:

catony

osuda:

catony

source: osuda
682 notes4.243:08 PM
source: funnywildlife
2,280 notes4.2412:48 PM
fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for Margot Fonteyn as Odelie in “Swan Lake”
Nicholas Georgiadis
1964

Nicholas Georgiadis designed this superb black and silver tutu worn by Margot Fonteyn as Odile in Act III of Swan Lake in Vienna in 1964. She and Rudolf Nureyev were a huge success in the ballet, receiving 49 curtain calls on the first night. Although a highly conventional style, the tutu does, in fact, subtly change over the years. In the 1950s, most tutu skirts were flat and rigid, and are often referred to as ‘plate’ tutus. This tutu is an example of the style of the 1960s and early 1970s, when the skirts softened into a gentle droop. The softer line suited Fonteyn at that late stage of her career, as did the bodice decoration, which subtly breaks up the surface without becoming fussy, with the main decoration concentrated at centre front. The skill in designing tutu bodices, which Georgiadis understood well, is to use decoration that will be practical for partnering; too many jewels or encrustations can cut a partner’s hands. Odile, the swan princess, has been dressed in white since Swan Lake was created in 1890, but the convention of dressing the evil Odile in black is a later development - Alicia Markova wore red when she danced Odile for the Vic-Wells (now Royal) Ballet in 1934. Black is now so widely accepted, that for over fifty years the Act III pas de deux has been called the Black Swan pas de deux.

V&A

fashionsfromhistory:

Costume for Margot Fonteyn as Odelie in “Swan Lake”

Nicholas Georgiadis

1964

Nicholas Georgiadis designed this superb black and silver tutu worn by Margot Fonteyn as Odile in Act III of Swan Lake in Vienna in 1964. She and Rudolf Nureyev were a huge success in the ballet, receiving 49 curtain calls on the first night. Although a highly conventional style, the tutu does, in fact, subtly change over the years. In the 1950s, most tutu skirts were flat and rigid, and are often referred to as ‘plate’ tutus. This tutu is an example of the style of the 1960s and early 1970s, when the skirts softened into a gentle droop. The softer line suited Fonteyn at that late stage of her career, as did the bodice decoration, which subtly breaks up the surface without becoming fussy, with the main decoration concentrated at centre front. The skill in designing tutu bodices, which Georgiadis understood well, is to use decoration that will be practical for partnering; too many jewels or encrustations can cut a partner’s hands. Odile, the swan princess, has been dressed in white since Swan Lake was created in 1890, but the convention of dressing the evil Odile in black is a later development - Alicia Markova wore red when she danced Odile for the Vic-Wells (now Royal) Ballet in 1934. Black is now so widely accepted, that for over fifty years the Act III pas de deux has been called the Black Swan pas de deux.

V&A

463 notes4.2412:45 PM

234 Female Students Went Missing in Nigeria, and the Media Has Barely Covered It »

thepoliticalfreakshow:

The news: South Korea’s tragic ferry disaster has gripped international headlines for the past week as the world watched with bated breath to find out what happened. Though 159 bodies have been discovered by divers, another 143 still remain missing — and families and loved ones are hoping against hope that they are somehow still alive.

But on the other side of the world, 234 schoolgirls in Nigeria, ages 16 to 18, wereabducted two days before the South Korean incident. Armed men broke into a school in the northeastern city of Chibok, shot the guards and took the girls away while they were taking a physics exam. The attack has been linked to Boko Haram, a jihadist affiliate of al-Qaida.

So why haven’t we heard about it? Simply put, because the world has very different views on South Korea and Nigeria. One is among the richest countries in the world and a powerful Western ally with a high quality of life and strong international presence. The other is in Africa, where, you know, these things happen all the time — or so we’re led to believe.

"In Nigeria, the mass abduction of schoolgirls isn’t shocking," CNN claims. “No one knows where the missing girls are. And even more surprising, no one’s particularly shocked.”

Image Credit: Al-Jazeera

But that’s not true. Boko Haram, which is Hausa for “Western education is sinful,” is against the education of girls. Girls have been abducted in the past to serve as cooks or sex slaves — but a kidnapping of this size is unprecedented.

And despite what CNN might think, people aren’t simply giving up on the girls. Desperate family members and town residents have gone on the search, combing the Sambisa Forest, a known terrorist hangout, on motorcycles. The search parties have so far had some success, uncovering traces of the girls.

The government is not helping. According to the school, about 43 girls have already escaped their captors — no thanks to the authorities. ”None of these girls were rescued by the military; they managed to escape on their own from their abductors,” said schoolmaster Asabe Kwambura.

As recently as Monday, education authorities claimed that only 85 girls have gone missing, despite the families’ insistence that 234 were taken. The military even claimed at one point that they rescued all but eight girls — which they immediately retracted the following day.

Nigerian security officials insist they are in ”hot pursuit” of the abductors, but they’ve yet to find a single girl. ”It’s alarming that more than a week after these girls were abducted, there are not any concrete steps to get them back,” said Human Rights Watch’s Nigeria researcher Mausi Segun.

It’s a dangerous environment. Boko Haram has been on a rampage in recent months and on the same day as the girls’ abduction, the group claimed responsibility for a bombing in Abuja that killed 75. The terrorist group, which wants to establish an extremist Islamist state in northeastern Nigeria, has alreadykilled over 1,500 people this year.

But that does not mean we should look the other way when a tragedy like this takes place.

"The South Korean story has unfolded on camera, in a first-world country with every facility for news reporting. In contrast, the young Nigerians have vanished into the darkness of a dangerous world," Ann Perkins writes in the Guardian. "Nigeria is complex and messy and unfamiliar. It is easy to feel that what happens there is not real in the way that what happens on camera in South Korea is real."

The ugly truth is that when young lives are similarly at stake, we are more shocked when the danger takes place in a country that is considered stable and affluent — and less so in a country where violent insurgents are trying to take over.

But the media has a responsibility to report the truth rather than ignoring a story because it sounds familiar. It’s easy to become desensitized to stories coming out of a conflict-ridden region, but that doesn’t mean these human lives are worth any less.

Source: Eileen Shim for Policy Mic

2,099 notes4.2412:44 PM
[T]hey want so badly to be “hard” and “edgy” but most often the results are sour, false and cheap. DC Comics is in danger of becoming the literary equivalent of Axe Body Spray.

Steve Bennett on DC Comics (via cooltrainershells)

Whoops. Too late.

(via madameatomicbomb)

3,051 notes4.2412:42 PM
source: alastairbgray
4,865 notes4.2412:42 PM
source: pugdomination
11,854 notes4.2412:42 PM
happyfatblog:

Follow my sweet blog, I follow back :)http://happyfatblog.tumblr.com/

happyfatblog:

Follow my sweet blog, I follow back :)
http://happyfatblog.tumblr.com/

376 notes4.2412:42 PM